FOOD TO EXPERIENCE IN DUBLIN

While visiting the Irish capital, here are some ideas for traditional food to experience in Dublin during your stay. All of which have been passed down generations, yet remain at the very heart of authentic Irish cuisine.

As to where to sample such dishes, you are likely to be greeted with friendly faces, live music and a freshly poured Guinness. Food tours in Dublin will take you to where the locals eat, with thriving areas such as Temple Bar a hive of pubs and fine-dining restaurants.

Meanwhile, cookery classes are the chance to learn the classics from a professional chef, or alternatively take a tapas tour and try it all.

Irish Food to Experience in Dublin

The Best Food to Experience in Dublin

Below is a selection of Irish classics, which you can fin in almost any bar, restaurant or cookbook.

Irish Stew

The chances are, every chef in Dublin will have their own take on a traditional Irish stew. In what was once a simple one-pot cook using diced mutton and root vegetables, the humble stew now takes on a number of variations. Irish lamb can be slow-cooked for hours, while fresh herbs and the occasional bottle of stout use added to create a depth of flavour.

Coddle

Another one-pot favourite is that of “coddle”, often on the family dinner table towards the end of the week. Traditionally Coddle is made with leftovers, with sausage and bacon added to create a more wholesome dish.

Colcannon

If you’re a foodie already familiar with bubble ‘n’ squeak, then you’ll know what to expect with Colcannon. Mashed potatoes mixed with leftover greens such as cabbage, kale or Brussel sprouts. Although another use for leftovers, it can also be deliberately made, accompanying your main meal.

Irish Food to Experience in Dublin, Food Experience in Dublin

White Pudding

As well as maybe the use of colcannon, the difference between an English fry-up and one in Dublin is often down to the pudding. Although not to be confused with a dessert course, black pudding contains sausage meat with blood, fat and oatmeal. Whereas Irish white pudding is made without the addition of blood.

Soda Bread

With soups and stews popular among Irish cuisine, you certainly need something to soak up the liquid. Hence why soda bread is a must-try when in Ireland. Although readily available in the supermarket, you can’t beat freshly baked and straight out the oven.

Barmbrack

This fruit loaf is perfect at lunchtime or with an afternoon cup of tea. It’s origins go back to a time when a coin would be added as a good luck charm. The belief being whoever has the slice containing the coin would come into wealth. Similarly, other traditions include a rag to signify falling on hard times or a ring to indicate marriage being on the cards.

Food and Drink Experiences in Dublin

Book a tour or activity and find the best food to experience in Dublin with tabl.com.

We currently have two food tasting tours available to book online – the Irish Food Trail Experience Dublin and Tapas Trail Experience Dublin.