Aberdeen Food Tour

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Aberdeen Food Tour
Duration

Durations: 3 Hour(s)

Group Size

Group Size: 1+

Languages

Languages: English

Take a culinary walk with us and discover the food and traditions in the North East of Scotland. We'll go on a tasty food adventure with a sprinkle of city highlights and a dash of local culture.

From £ 62.00 per person

  1. Meeting Point
  2. Tour Overview

    We'll go on a tasty food adventure with a sprinkle of city highlights and a dash of local culture.

    From the meeting point we will take a walk through the heart of the city. On the tour you will eat your way through the city sampling our local specialities from some of the best places in Aberdeen. With a little bit of sightseeing and stories about each of the dishes you are tasting. We include at least 4 food stops and 1 drink stop on our tour and you'll be offered some samples to try. These are included in your tour price. 

    We don't want to give away all our secrets and we are going to leave a few surprises for you; but don't worry, you won't go hungry. Our regular tour offers a mixture of different foods including; dairy, breads, fish, meat, cheese and alcohol or substitute. In many cases our regular tour can accommodate vegetarian and vegan options.

  3. Tour Itinerary

    Day 1 : The Maritime Museum

    Start of Tour

    We start our tour learning about the maritime history and how the fishing industry contributed to the development of Aberdeen and the influences this had on our culinary past.  With views over Aberdeen Harbour, the fish district as well as learning about some remnants of the late medieval parts of the city.  

    We will enjoy a sample here before we have the first course of our culinary excursion.


    The Green

    Once a thriving community

    The Green was once the heart of working class Aberdeen and where the weekly market used to be held. Today there are several great food places including and occasional markets and festival. The Green also plays host to several of Aberdeen's NUART murals as well as Painted Doors showing a variety of Urban Art.

    In medieval times the Green was very  much a craft and trade area in the burgh. Indeed in a tax list of 1509 there  were 38 female brewers working and selling ale in the Green. The Green was  also something of a religious centre for Aberdeen. The Carmelite monks, or Whitefriars, arrived in the  Green in 1273. Over the 300 years that the Carmelites resided here.

    The Green was also home to several large mills which are now demolished. Hadden’s Mill on the Green – Spinning, Weaving & Carpet making.  Hadden’s had more than 20 Stocking Machines wrought by 2 Steam Engines making Frocks, Mitts & all sorts of Hosiery.  


    Belmont Street

    The edge of town

    Belmont Street was Open Pasture running alongside the Denburn until the 1770s. Belmont Street originated with the late 18th century expansion of the town.  It was part of development out of the town in to the West by the towns richer residents. The Denburn river which ran alongside Belmont was once used to vessels from the harbour to deliver good to this part of town and in the late 1700' was home to a Fine Public Baths served by Springwater.  

    The Gaelic Chapel –  was Founded in the 18th century because of the rise in numbers of displaced Highlanders who came to the City in search of work. For a time there was a steady Influx of Highlanders in search of Employment at the Public Works in the City and the Granite Quarries in the neighbourhood.

    We will have our second course of the tour in Belmont Street.


    Marischal College

    Granite & Kings

    The impressive Marischal College was founded in 1593, at a time when there were very few educational institutions. The building was expanded and rebuilt in the early 1900's and now is believed to be the second largest granite building in the world.  Standing in front is the statue of Robert the Bruce holding a charter for the city of Aberdeen.  At this stop you'll learn more about how the city evolved and the coat of arms. 

    A further tasting of locally made produce and a toast to the Scottish King in recognition of his status.


    Provost Skene House

    Time for something sweet

    Provost Skene’s House is open to visitors following a major refurbishment. The new attraction celebrates the pioneering people of Aberdeen and the North-East of Scotland who have not only shaped the city, but have also helped transform the world. You'll learn a bit about the building's history and Guestrow. 

    A North East icon, Mackie's opened their ice cream parlour only a couple of years ago. It is exactly 19.2 miles from the farm so very few food miles for this delicious treat. Mackie's offer a range of creative ice cream flavours and sorbets. They even have a chocolate fountain for you to add a little extra.



    The Craftsman Coffee & Ale House

    Drinks are on us

    Finishing up our tour, it is time to explore the wonderful world that is Whisky & Gin. Aberdeenshire is home to a host of; craft breweries, gin distilleries, rum distilleries and don't forget whisky!

    The Craftsman offers a wide selection of these and we will be able to sample some in the form of cocktails or drinks from the bar. We will discover the history and unique features of several of the producers. We may be able to squeeze in a visit to a Gin Distiller in the near future so watch this space!


  4. What's Included

    On this tour your food and drink samples & tastings are included in your ticket.

  5. FAQs

    Please Note:

    Please advise whether you have any dietary requirements (i.e. vegan/vegetarian, or allergies).

  6. Requirements

    Be sure to have warm outdoor clothing and be prepared for wet weather. Comfortable walking shoes.

  7. Cancellation Policy

    • We will charge a cancellation fee of 100% if booking is cancelled 23 hours or less before event